11 Aug'17

Lonely Planet using GPS in new mobile app

Lonely Planet’s new app, Trips, will be released on Tuesday 12th August.

 

The new Lonely Planet app gathers information about your trip using GPS data, and subsequently the app can offer added insight about the place you, or your friend, have visitedHere is the full article on BBC News.

 

Here at The Report, we love hearing of companies using ‘data’ to drive their services and/or products. For this reason, the Lonely Planet’s app use of GPS data is right up our street.

 

Data-led digital products are more effective because they allow companies to deliver personalised services, which is what consumers are asking for. This is evidenced in Salesforce’s latest State of Connected Customer 2016 report, which found ‘65 per cent (of the more than 7000 consumers and business buyers surveyed globally) say a personalised or exclusive offer is influencing their brand loyalty.’ From looking at this trend, we expect other companies to follow suit, and develop their products/services using data.

 

Although the BBC headlined the article ‘Lonely Planet attempts Instagram competitor’, The Report does not believe this to be the significant part of the report. And neither does the Lonely Planet’s Chief Executive, Daniel Houghton.

 

Houghton argued, ‘I don’t think it’s a one or the other [Trips or Instagram], I don’t expect anyone to stop using those platforms,

“People use different social networks in different ways.

” I will still post my images [on Instagram] as well. This is a more heavily narrated, editorial story’
According to the BBC, Houghton is more interested in the message ‘Algorithms don’t have good taste. At least not yet’.

 

We are also of the opinion that the development of data-driven technology is more of an interest than the comparison of platforms themselves. This is because, although there is a demand for personalised customer experienced, there is still some way to go.

 

David Aponovich, Senior Director of digital experience at Acquia, states that while many companies are striving for personalisation, but many do not succeed.

 

Aponovich stated in an interview with Marketing Week, ‘My point of view on personalisation is that a lot of it is ugly. Generally, data says that 90% of companies do or want to do personalisation yet if you look at it, less than 20% are doing it, so there’s a gap.’

 

The Report is excited to see what new products/services will be launched that use data, and how far this will go.